3D street art saves lives

Street art like all other art is sometimes criticized for its perceived lack of function. Some people say things like β€œWhy would you spend million dollars for a red square on a canvas” or β€œI don’t get it.” Fortunately, street art tends to have a clearer message and purpose than those dusty old paintings hanging in museums. Most street art serves to express the sentiments of the street (i.e. people not liking a certain presidential candidate), some exist to be beautiful examples of the creativity and skill of their artist, and some are used to make the roads safer.

 Expressing the sentiments of a shitty (see what I did there) presidential candidate.

Expressing the sentiments of a shitty (see what I did there) presidential candidate.

It sounds a bit strange but when you mix an understanding of geometry and perspective with the ability to work with bright paint and add it to a situation where pedestrian safety is lacking, a terrific example of functional art comes to life. In cities in India, Iceland, China, and Kyrgyzstan photos of 3D cross walks have surfaced as an innovative way to grab the attention of drivers. I guess nothing works better than the β€œthreat” of driving into concrete pillars to make a driver pay attention.